PROJECTS





Empowering bold leadership for the common good.


Cooperative Competition

The collaborative leadership we shepherd renovates cooperation and transforms competition.  Competition must be for the betterment of society. It ought not be merely over power, resources or converts, though the influence of such struggles is real and persists. Fruitful cooperation dwells amongst healthy forms of conflict and competition.

Who's Involved?

Leaders in civil society, government, academics and business who have stakes in religion’s local and transnational influence populate Pathways initiatives. Various interests and identities, faith-based and otherwise, motivate their pursuit of collaboration that is fruitful within and beyond the bounds of their own communities.

How do we work?

We empower leaders by enhancing their social, intellectual, emotional and spiritual capital.

 

Cutting-edge research and innovative collaboration across cultural, religious and political boundaries ground all that we do.


We disrupt deficient assumptions, patterns, processes, and conclusions.


Controversy signals to us opportunity for healing, growth, and advancement.

Sample of Our Projects


  • Race, Islamophobia, and Policing

    This project facilitated cooperative leadership by more conservative evangelical and Muslims leaders to pursue the common good in the greater New Haven area. Realizing that the intersection of race relations and Islamophobia threatened the city with suspicion and fear, we decided to initiate a process by which community members across salient dividing lines could begin to build relationship, talk about their shared and diverging experiences and interests and work together toward a common goal. The desired outcome was to address concrete problems while working together toward healing and restoration in our community. Leaders focused on the intersections between race-police, Muslim-police, and inter-race relations within religious communities and amidst the cities diverse demographics. Participants included evangelical leaders from white, black and multiethnic churches, Muslim leaders, New Haven chief of police, Yale Chief of Police, local FBI and New Haven alders. Our deliberations centered on how leaders were guiding their communities to respond to these issues, the distinct teachings of their religions on those matters, and what might be done to address them in the greater New Haven area. The culminating event was a community round table. Primary outcomes included integration of the local Muslim leadership into the mechanisms by which police leadership interacts with New Haven clergy and the emergence of a follow up project focused on youth.

  • Christians Engaging Global Conflict: Syria & ISIS


    November 2016, evangelical leaders, practitioners, and policy experts gathered for a timely discussion regarding response to violent conflict. With diverse voices across gender, ethnic, and theological lines, we examined vital lessons from conflicts with ISIS and Syria, and discussed how the evangelical church could boldly engage in the midst of war and terrorism. Primary outcomes included the formation of four working groups to advance work on issues identified through the consultation: Young Peacebuilders, US Policy on Syria, Evangelical relations with Muslims and Syrian displaced peoples. Three of these four working groups are still active.  



  • Religious diplomacy in the Middle East

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  • Support to U.S. mosque communities under threat

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  • Connecting young peacebuilders in the U.S. and Liberia

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  • Teacher training

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  • Training for Muslim-Christian relations

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  • Training for religious diplomacy

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  • Post-conflict youth peacebuilding in West Africa

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  • Gender, power, and Muslim-Christian relations

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  • Expanding 'Peace Generation' in Southeast Asia

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  • Muslim-Christian relations in Pakistan

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Pathways Institute

The vision of the Pathways Institute is to support flourishing communities and societies by empowering leaders to strategically collaborate across religious and cultural boundaries. Pathways, in cooperation with world-class higher education institutions, gathers outstanding groups of emerging leaders from around the globe for professional and academic upgrading that infuses hands-on leadership with the insights of relevant scholarship. The unique curriculum is designed to equip leaders, scholars, and educators who hold religious and non-religious commitments to productively work alongside those with contrasting convictions. This capacity is fundamental to leadership for the common good of society and harmonious coexistence within diverse communities.

Past Institutes

The first three Pathways Institutes were held at Yale University in cooperation with the Yale Center for Faith and Culture (YCFC). In January 2013, Pathways and YCFC partnered with the Institute for Advanced Studies of Islam (IAIS) of Malaysia, the National University of Singapore and other organizations in Asia to conduct the Institute in Singapore, entitled “Faith & Society - Leadership Amidst Controversy.”  Participating leaders went on to develop multiple new projects, including publishing, public forums, training programs, and the expansion of projects into new markets.  The next institute is set to be in Malaysia in 2018, initiated and coordinated by alumni and partners in the region.

Program

The gathered 25-35 leaders from diverse faith backgrounds come open to collaborate with others for the good of the wider society.  Research-informed lectures and discussions are combined with simulations, community engagement, and workshops to build both intellectual and social capital.  Topics center on culture and power shifts particular to the local context.

Past Lecturers

The 2013 Institute in Singapore gathered lecturers from the Southeast Asian region as well as reputed institutions in the United States.  Among them:

  • Chandra Muzaffar, Islamic Institute of Advanced Islamic Studies
  • David Johnston, University of Pennsylvania
  • John Hartley, Yale University and Pathways for Mutual Respect
  • Syed Farid Alatas, National University of Singapore
  • Malcom Tan, Baker Road Methodist Church
  • Kamar Oniah Kamaruzaman, International Islamic University

Stranger2Neighbor Suppers

Media depictions make relationships between evangelical Christians and Muslim refugees seem hopeless.  Public opinion polls seem to agree.  Is this the way it has to be?  

 

Pathways partners with evangelical churches to host Stranger2Neighbor Suppers. These dinners provide opportunity for both Muslim refugees and evangelical Christians to meet and share their own stories.


How it works

A Muslim refugee chef prepares a traditional dinner from their own culture, while a local Christian pastor hosts the chef’s family and invites 8-10 leaders from their church to join them in this traditional meal; thus, the minister’s hospitality to the refugee meets the chef’s hospitality in meal-making. As the chef and family share their stories, church leaders grow in understanding; as church leaders take time to listen and bless, the refugees experience fellowship. All arrive strangers and leave neighbors. Each guest pays $35, which provides income for the chef.

Multiplication

The impact doesn’t end with one dinner. We ask each hosting pastor to recruit at least one guest to host a future dinner in their home and in turn recruit one of their guests to do the same. As the chefs attend each dinner, they make friendly connections with more and more Christians while more and more evangelical Christians gain first-hand experience with Muslim refugees.

What it's about

Building relationships between people of different identities and experiences can be challenging. Many of our dinner guests may not have spent time with Muslim refugees, nor the refugees with evangelical Christians. We don’t pretend that there is a simple solution. Yet through interactions such as these, authentic relationships are made possible.

Support Stranger2Neighbor

Are you passionate about making strangers into neighbors?  By supporting this project financially, you'll help spread Stranger2Neighbor Suppers into more churches in our community and other cities around the country.